Beyond Earth Day

It was 1970. The nuclear non-proliferation treaty had passed and the Beatles had disbanded; climate change was already in full march. It was also the year in which President Nixon signed the National Environmental Policy Act. A law that required the federal government to use “all practicable means to create and maintain conditions under which man and nature could exist in productive harmony”. The year prior, Senator Nelson had witness a horrific event, the 1969 Santa Barbara oil spill, and he had decided he had enough. Environmental causes and disasters needed to come under the spotlight, and for that purpose he created Earth Day. The first Earth Day was a revelation, and it gave rise to the modern environmental movement we know. Benefiting from the energy remaining from the post-war movements and protests, 20 million demonstrators rallied together in cities and communities around the country. Today Earth Day has risen to be an international movement and hundreds of millions of people gather around the world. Even though this piece is about Earth Day—which was yesterday, we chose to post it one day later to remind you all that one day is simply not enough. We must care for our planet every day and every year, as our care and love may, in the end, be the best fit tool to spin everything around

 A photo of our beautiful planet by Jakob Owens

A photo of our beautiful planet by Jakob Owens